Sites, scents and a sense of self


Looking back at Spring School 2017

GSA Highlands & Islands recently hosted the annual Spring School at the Creative Campus.

The seasonal schools for postgraduate research students – Winter, Spring and Autumn – are an important part of our innovative modes of distributed delivery.

InDI’s Master of Research and PhD students make up the Creative Campus Cohort. Students with shared interests work together to evolve Design Innovation methodologies.

Spring School is designed as an opportunity to not only bring the cohort together and build the relationship of the group but to deliver the skills required to be a world class researcher.

This year’s programme included a range of workshops aimed at developing critical writing and research skills. Students engaged in activities based around crystallising their research processes, articulating their own position within their context of inquiry, and reflecting on the multisensory elements of the methods and approaches that they are developing and applying.

A workshop ‘Artefacts, Sites and Processes’, hosted by Dr Frances Robertson and Mairi Mackenzie, involved object-orientated exercises, including a ‘smell walk’, a sense-driven journey around the Altyre Campus. Each student was also asked to communicate our practices and research contexts through the analysis of everyday objects. 

pots spring school

Objects chosen by the Spring School students to represent their practice. Image credit: Rhona McNicol

Stationary spring school

Objects chosen by the Spring School students to represent their practice. Image credit: Zoe Prosser

Here PhD student Anna Spencer reflects on her experience of the event.

There is a different quality to the cohort schools – being surrounded by a local community to that of being surrounded by your academic peers. This is the fifth school I have attended and I think I am now learning how to navigate them and make the most of the experience.

“Spring School 2017 had a clear developmental arc with specific moments of challenge and input along the way which demonstrated a depth of consideration to the cohorts’ current positions. In particular, the pairing of M.Res. students with PhD students in line with areas of common interest was really rewarding and offers a good precedent for how overlapping cohorts can interact over time with students clustering around shared themes.

“The emphasis of the week was to develop confidence in our sense of self – our practice, our position in the research and how we present this through our writing. Through contemplating site and scent we creatively explored the world views and assumptions we bring to our research. In order to better understand what is right in front of you, it must be viewed indirectly. It can be really liberating to look at your current research and practice through an entirely new lens.”

To read more about Anna’s work and the rest of the PhD students, see our PhD student page. More information about the M.Res. students is available here.

And you can also read about our programme of Seasonal Schools.

Lorianna Smell walk

Lorianna Paradise explores Altyre Estate during the Artefacts, Sites and Processes workshop. Image credit: Rhona McNicol

 


In pictures: Design Innovation students unveil their projects in Moray


Return of the Winter School projects

The spirit of Winter School returned to the GSA’s Highlands and Islands Creative Campus this week with. Glasgow-based MDES Design Innovation students travelled north to join their Forres counterparts for a special session to present the outcomes of their group projects.

The projects started at Winter School in January when teams of students worked with community groups and businesses from the Moray area to explore the theme of Innovation from Tradition. You can read more about Winter School and what happened in our blogs from the event, or watch the film here.

The local organisations were invited back to the campus this week to see the outcomes, give their feedback and discuss how the findings could be used in the future. The event on Tuesday involved presentations from 12 groups, covering subjects including arts, music, food and drink and the third sector.

There was also an exhibition of the project summaries, which were exhibited in the GSA’s Reid Building last month.

Presentation audience

The audience at the MDES student presentations at GSA Highlands and Islands. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Forres-based MDES group with community organisations

The Forres-based MDES students with Jackie Mclaren, of tsiMORAY (third from left) and Debbie Heron, of FACT (third from right). Image credit: Paul Campbell

Projects proposed included immersive visitor experiences at Knockando Woolmill; a service to match volunteers with suitable experiences, a whisky subscription box and a festival to encourage more civic participation.

The community and business organisations were impressed to hear the progress that the students had made.

Knockando Woolmill student group

Julie Schack Petersen and Junyuan Chen with Emma Nicolson, Marketing and Merchandising Manager at Knockando Woolmill (centre). Image credit: Paul Campbell

Students presenting Johnstons of Elgin project

Puja Parekh and Andrea Farias present their project, Re-imagining Johnstons of Elgin. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Now the students are in the final stage of their programmes: their final solo project. Their work will continue throughout the summer, culminating in their projects being shown at Graduate Degree Show on 1-8 September.

To find out more about studying Design Innovation, visit our Teaching pages.

Student project summaries on display

Project summaries on display at GSA Highlands and Islands. Image credit: Paul Campbell


Design Innovation students return to Moray to present their projects


Businesses and community organisations looking forward to hearing progress after Winter School

The Glasgow School of Art’s Design Innovation Masters students will present their end of semester projects at the GSA’s new Highlands and Islands Creative Campus later this month. The projects address a range of issues relating to Moray businesses and communities.

People from Moray-based organisations will attend the presentations on Tuesday 6th June to give feedback and explore how students’ ideas can be taken forward in the future.

The group of 22 students includes the first cohort to have attended the GSA’s Altyre campus since it opened last year.

Knockando Woolmill project

Student presentation material from Winter School 2017. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Students have addressed the theme of “Innovation from Tradition”, and have worked with a number of businesses and community groups including Knockando Woolmill, Johnstons of Elgin, and tsiMORAY. Students worked in teams to address various areas such as Craft and Making, Spirituality and Belief, Music and the Arts, and Community and the Economy.

They addressed research questions including:

– How can Johnstons of Elgin leverage its history, traditions and assets to generate new value?

– How can volunteering act as a two-way bridge between Syrian New Scots and the Forres community?

The Innovation from Tradition theme was launched during Winter School 2017: the GSA’s pioneering annual teaching event held at the campus.

Student presentations Winter School 2017

Material from the students’ presentation at Winter School 2017. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Students on Design Innovation Masters programmes worked alongside counterparts from Köln International School of Design (KISD) in Germany, and the Royal Academy of Art & Design (KADK) in Denmark, to frame research questions related to the local Moray community.

Through their studio work, students went on to investigate the role of ‘social design’ to engage with people, and the role of designers as innovators in the service of wider society.

Emma Nicolson, Marketing and Merchandising Manager at Knockando Woolmill, said: “It has been great to continue working with the international students and have them trial ideas at the Woolmill. It was interesting to see the interaction of the public with the prototypes they installed, and I am looking forward to seeing their findings in the final presentations.

“It will be exciting to see the full journey the project has taken from the initial research we saw back in January.”

Jackie Maclaren, Operations Manager at tsiMORAY, added: “Having met and worked with students from The Glasgow School of Art over the last few months, staff at tsiMORAY look forward with great interest to the outcomes of their projects. It has been truly refreshing and inspiring to have been involved with their creativity and innovation. We look forward to continued partnership working.”

Amy O’Meara, who is on the Design Innovation and Service Design programme, said: “Winter School was an immersive learning experience, which saw us engaging with various heritage organisations across the Moray region. The relationships we forged with these businesses, such as Knockando Woolmill and Johnstons of Elgin, either led directly to exciting design collaborations or informed how our project took shape throughout the term.

“Innovation from Tradition was the overarching theme that acted as a catalyst to propel our projects forward and also motivate us to extend the limits of our practice. Exploring how traditions could be innovated in the contexts of our projects was challenging but also hugely rewarding, giving meaning to our roles as Design Innovation Masters students.”

GSA Highlands and Islands

GSA Highlands and Islands. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Design Innovation lecturer Dr Brian Dixon commented: “Many of our students have explored aspects of the Scotland’s rich social and cultural heritage that are often taken for granted or overlooked. For example, the production of wool and cashmere, or community volunteering. As the projects have developed, we’ve found that, in many cases, partner organisations have really benefitted from the opportunity to reflect, take stock and recognise the potential of what’s already there.”

And to find out just what happened at Winter School please watch our film. There’s also more information about the two-week event in our collection of blogs.

You can find more information on our pages about the Design Innovation Masters programmes and GSA’s new Highlands and Islands Creative Campus.

 


Seasonal Schools: an innovative teaching method


Research and Teaching on location at the GSA Highlands and Islands

InDI is proud of its teaching and research activities that support postgraduate students, researchers and academics. They offer an excellent chance to meet others in your field and learn about their experiences.

With the deadline for applications for Summer School 2017 in Lancaster extended until April 7, we’re reflecting on our Seasonal Schools and what they offer the people who take part.

InDI offers two main seasonal schools throughout the year: Winter School and Summer School.

Summer School

Organised by the Leapfrog team, the Summer School programme aims to help early career researchers to develop their skills. The three-day event includes a programme of lectures and discussions as well as sharing work and ideas.

Last year’s event was the first and took place in Forres, exploring action research with delegates from across the UK and overseas.

Leapfrog Summer School on the beach.

Leapfrog Summer School on Findhorn beach.

Applications for 2017 are open until Friday April 7. The event, from July 11-13, will take place at Lancaster University, where our Leapfrog partners, ImaginationLancaster, are based. The programme, titled Exploring Community Engagement for Research: Power, Impact and Collaborationwill share methods and insights around effective engagement and evidence the impact of these approaches. Professor Rachel Cooper OBE, Distinguished Professor of Design Management and Policy at Lancaster University, will give a keynote.

Delegates will take part in a series of presentations, discussions and workshops to enrich their understanding and applications of community engagement in a wide range of research contexts.

This video of the 2016 event gives a flavour of the Leapfrog Summer School:

Leapfrog Summer School 2016: Action Research, Engagement, & Co-​design from leapfrogtools on Vimeo.

You can find more information about the 2017 event and download an application pack on the Leapfrog website.

Winter School

As you can tell from our recent blogs, Winter School is an action-packed and high profile event.

The two-week residency at GSA Highlands and Islands involves students from our own MDES Design Innovation programmes as well as students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation (KADK) in Copenhagen. The international element is boosted by faculty from all over the world, who provide enlightening talks for the students.

Winter School 2018 will also involve students from Audencia Business School in France. Audencia and InDI have collaborated to develop an exciting MSc programme in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy. Led by Audencia, the programme launches in September 2017. GSA faculty members will teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week international Winter School at the GSA Highlands and Islands Creative Campus, is a highlight of the programme.

Jenny Houldsworth speaks to Winter School students

Jenny Houldsworth from Johnstons of Elgin speaks to Winter School students

The students explore a theme relevant to the local context and work with businesses and community organisations to gain insight into the topic. Working in groups, they explore a design research question. For GSA students, this is the first step in their Stage 2 project.

You can see what we got up to at Winter School 2017 in this video:

Winter School 2017 from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

For more information about Winter School, please contact Dr Gordon Hush, [email protected]


Meet our new Master of Research students


New additions to our Creative Campus cohort

InDI recently welcomed a new group of students onto our Master of Research programme.

They follow in the footsteps of the first four students from 2016. The five-strong group are all multidisciplinary creative practitioners, based in Moray at the Creative Campus and in Cowal.

The group is supported and funded by the Creative Futures Partnership (CFP). This is a pioneering venture between The Glasgow School of Art and Highlands and Islands Enterprise. It has been established to deliver transformational benefits for the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

The MRES journey started at Winter School 2017 in January, when students met some of the outgoing MRES group and the current PhD candidates.

The new MRESs took part in a range of research, training workshops and masterclasses to prepare them for their year of study.

They are part of the Creative Campus cohort, along with the three Creative Campus PhDs. Each research project is individually led but exists within the network of other researchers. Together they are pioneering academic research through a practice-based cohort at the campus distributed throughout the Highlands and Islands. The cohort also take part in Autumn and Spring School each year.

InDI is also currently recruiting for the next intake of MRES students. You can find out more about the programmes available on the GSA’s website.

Inquiries should be made to Dr Lynn-Sayers McHattie at [email protected]

 

Meet the students

Hannah ClinchHannah Clinch

Since graduating The Glasgow School of Art in 1999 with a BA in Textile Design, Hannah has worked at the intersection of design and enterprise, providing tailored support to a range of SMEs, social enterprises and creative initiatives operating in a community context. Hannah has collaborated with a broad range of partners to develop multidisciplinary projects.

Read more about Hannah’s work here.

Rhona McNicolRhona McNicol

With a degree in Product Design, Rhona considers herself a designer with an accelerative interest in design for social environments. Working within the Highlands and Island landscape, her current work focuses on rural sheep farming and crofting in Scotland.

Read more about Rhona’s work here.

 

Lorianna ParadiseLorianna Paradise

Lorianna navigates the ever-accumulating totality of everything all at once through the lens of an artist embodying the concept of living as form. An ecologically minded holistic approach to all lifestyle practices informs and broadens the scope of her work.

Read more about Lorianna’s work here.

Zoe ProsserZoë Prosser

Zoë is a Glaswegian designer with a degree in Product Design. In response to emerging socio-economic movements she attempts to instigate social innovation on a local level by applying design practices with a grassroots approach. She has applied this style of working to the phenomena of community landownership in Scotland by co-design to encourage democratic participation and decision-making.

Read more about Zoë’s work here.

 

Sophia SheppardSophia Sheppard

Sophia has a background in Communication Design, with a particular interest in film. Her current research explores the way that film might be used in a dialogue to reflect and build on individual and shared narratives in rural Scottish communities. Her work is rooted in an underlying awareness of how people have been separated from their histories and an interest in documenting and discussing how aspects of the past may positively influence the future.

Read more about Sophia’s work here.


Watch Winter School 2017: the official film


Relive the spirit of Winter School

Our new film gives you a flavour of our recent Winter School, which brought together around 100 leading international design experts, researchers and students to the GSA’s Highlands and Islands Creative Campus in Moray. 

It shows all the sights and sounds – and the people – who took part in the hugely successful event. There’s some spectacular shots of our new campus and even a bit of ceilidh dancing!

Led by InDI, Winter School is one of the highlights of the GSA’s academic calendar. The two-week programme, which runs every January, includes lectures, workshops, research and joint projects with local businesses and communities. Students and academics explore themes rooted in the local context but with global resonances.

The theme this year was Innovation from Tradition, which explores how past tradition can inspire future ways of working and, in particular, the role that design can play.

Our guest speakers travelled from across the world to take part, including Portugal, Italy, the US, India and Singapore.

Postgraduate students from the GSA’s Masters students on Design Innovation and Communication Design programmes were joined by students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation). 

Winter School 2017 from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.


Leapfrog into summer


Thinking about coming to this year’s Leapfrog Summer School?

Applications are now welcome for the 2017 event, which will share methods and insights around effective engagement.

The Summer School, which will be held at Lancaster University (where InDI’s Leapfrog partner, Imagination Lancaster is based, aims to develop early career researchers’ capabilities. Discussions will also focus on how to capture value and evidence the impact of their approach.

The application deadline is March 24. More information is available here on the Leapfrog website. You can also read more about the Leapfrog project here.

Find out what happened at last year’s Summer School in Forres by watching this film.

Leapfrog Summer School 2016: Action Research, Engagement, & Co-​design from leapfrogtools on Vimeo.


Winter School 2017: Working with Moray businesses


Sharing our students work

Here the InDI blog showcases two of the student projects started at Winter School 2017. The projects are now ongoing as part of the curriculum within the GSA’s Masters of Design Innovation Programmes.

This year’s theme is Innovation from Tradition, which explores how past tradition can inspire future ways of working, and the role that design can play.

Students will continue their studies and collaborations for the next three months around themes relating to life and work in the Highlands and Islands and Moray.

A student looking at Winter School projects

Contemplating the Winter School 2017 work. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Theme: Community and Economy
Community groups:  tsiMORAY (Third Sector Interface Moray) and FACT (Forres Area Community Trust)

MDES Design Innovation and Citizenship student Juan Pablo Ortiz explains how his group approached this theme:

For the two weeks of the Winter School I was placed in a group with two other students from my specialisation and two students from the Masters in Forres.

The first week was dedicated to understanding what they do and how they work: the varied and complex system of the third sector and its particular activeness and importance in the area.

Having this mapped out, both conceptually and geographically, we identified volunteering and communication as the areas to focus on.

Group of students

MDES Design Innovation and Citizenship student Juan Pablo Ortiz and his group at Winter School 2017. 

During the second week, we defined a question as a starting point for our second stage project:

How could current knowledge transfer systems be transformed for the enablement of more sustainable and inclusive volunteering in Moray?

Over the last two days, we planned and built an exhibition to show our findings. We created a frame with three maps of Moray representing the theme and our findings. The maps covered three aspects related to the theme:

– Individual: represented through a diffused map using tea bags as a metaphor of the individual knowledge that spreads in the right conditions, and the dialogue tool to allow conversations.
– Organisational: represented through a map with strings of different thickness as the links between the organisations, showing also how this covers geographical areas.
– Macro: represented through a map with important fact and key words for the Moray third sector and economy.

Students' teabag installation

The exhibition piece made by Juan’s group. Image credit: Paul Campbell

What I enjoyed the most about the Winter School was how immersive it was in terms of sharing at a global scale (all the visitors and students from other schools) and at a local scale (the organisations we worked with and the places we visited), and see what is being done around this emerging field of design and its potential.

Debbie Herron, of FACT, said: “We were very excited to be invited to be part of the GSA’s Winter School, as it gave us the opportunity to meet those students that are studying locally as well as those from Glasgow.

“The questions asked and the work the students did enabled us to look at our work differently too and it was very interesting to see how things developed over the Winter School.

“We saw how the students all came at the different projects in such creative ways and the final presentations certainly gave us more information about our area and highlighted new ways of consulting and collecting information from our community. I certainly will be using the techniques in the future.”

Theme: Music and the Arts
Business: Knockando Woolmill

Music and The Arts has a rich history in Scotland and hand-made artefacts and song are intrinsically linked to many Scottish traditions. The scope for design opportunities and innovative solutions within this field was obvious in the project context of “Innovation from Tradition”.

Knockando Woolmill students

Students working with Knockando Woolmill getting ready for the presentation. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Students from Service Design worked with Knockando Woolmill. Here, Amy O’Meara shares how their collaboration will inform their future studies relevant to the region.

Through Winter School we worked with Knockando Woolmill, an 18th-century wool and textile mill within the Spey Valley. At the site, we were led on a comprehensive tour and met with some of the staff.

Coming out of the visit, a key insight we noticed was that Knockando functions as both a traditional production site while also being a tourist and heritage attraction, and as such there is a delicate balance within Knockando as a business. Further investigation may also involve what relationship Knockando has within the local community, in terms of engagement with local citizens.

We finished Winter School with a research question that aims to investigate the balance between tourism and production at Knockando. We aim to incorporate our theme of ‘music and the arts’ in terms of craft and production, in order to make it relevant to our them.

Knockando Woolmill spindles

The Knockando Woolmill project. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Emma Nicolson, Marketing and Merchandising Manager from Knockando Woolmill said: “It has been fantastic to work with the international students for their Winter School project, and have them explore the Woolmill site. It was interesting to see their interpretation of the Woolmill through their fresh eyes, and the potential challenges they identified in their exhibition.

“It will be exciting to see how the students expand on their initial research, and what modern design solutions they might suggest for our historical site.”

For more information, check out Knockando’s blog

For more information on Winter School please contact Dr Gordon Hush, [email protected]

 


Design Innovation student projects launched following Winter School


Sharing the results of our work

Winter School 2017 may have drawn to a close, but it is only the beginning of the journey for many of the students who took part. Student projects, which were developed at the Winter School, have now launched as part of the curriculum within the GSA’s Masters of Design Innovation Programmes.

This year’s theme is Innovation from Tradition, which explores how past tradition can inspire future ways of working, and the role that design can play.

Students will continue their studies and collaborations for the next three months around themes relating to life and work in the Highlands and Islands and Moray.

Knockando Woolmill project

Student work from the project with Knockando Woolmill. Image credit: Paul Campbell

The Winter School saw around 100 leading international design experts, researchers and students from across the world come to the GSA’s Highlands and Islands Creative Campus to frame research questions and projects relevant to the region. Students from Köln International School of Design (KISD), and KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation) joined GSA students to work with local businesses and communities to develop project themes.

A host of businesses and community groups took part including:
Findhorn Bay Arts
Johnstons of Elgin
Pluscarden Abbey
Ballindalloch Distillery
Knockando Woolmill
The Altyre Estate
Piping at Forres
Forres Area Community Trust
Third Sector Interface Moray
Forsyths
The Burghead Clavie
Findhorn Foundation
Gordon & McPhail
Castle to Cathedral to Cashmere Project

Students addressed a variety of themes with local people:
– Music and the Arts
– Community and Economy
– House, Home and Hearth
– Food and Drink
– Spirituality and Belief
– Community and Economy
– History, Fantasy and Myth

Hear what Jenny Houldsworth, Culture and Communication Manager at Johnstons of Elgin, had to say about working with the students:

Why Winter School 2017 was full of “happy surprises” for one business from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

In our next blog, we’ll share two of the students project with you. Other Winter School blogs can be found here.

To read more about Winter School and our other Seasonal Schools, see our pages on InDI web.

 

Community and business representatives arrive for Winter School

Community and business representatives who worked with our Winter School students. Image credit: Paul Campbell


Winter School 2017: the final dance


Dancing into the wee hours…

One of the highlights was definitely the ceilidh on the final night. With the presentations completed, everyone’s minds turned to the meal and dancing.

With the marquee transformed into a dancefloor, things were a little slow to kick off. But soon students from all institutions were throwing themselves into the complex moves of Strip the Willow, the Gay Gordons and the Dashing White Sergeant – led by the Scottish contingent. And we enjoyed some traditional singing.

The whole of InDI was very impressed with everyone’s efforts. Learning Scottish dancing on the hoof is no mean feat.

And it is no exaggeration to say that the marquee was jumping and for many the night continued into the small hours. We hope there were not too many sore heads for the journey home.

Here’s some of the best pictures from the night and catch up with all the goings-on from the event on our blog!

Students birlin’ on the dancefloor. Image credit: Paul Campbell

ceilidh dancer

InDI staff Sneha Raman and Fergus Fullarton-Pegg take to the floor. Image credit: Paul Campbell

ceilidh kilt

Staff and students dancing the Dashing White Sergeant. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Group of people ceilidh dancing

Operations director Marianne McInnes gets in on the dancing. Image credit: Paul Campbell

ceilidh band

The ceilidh band. Image credit: Paul Campbell

ceilidh dancing

More Dashing White Sergeant. Image credit: Paul Campbell


Five minutes with a Winter School expert: Catherine Morel

Catherine Morel is Professor of Marketing in the Culture and Communication Department at Audencia Business School in France. Catherine has collaborated with InDI over the last two years to develop an exciting MSc programme in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy. Led by Audencia in France, the programme and has been co-designed with InDI.

The programme launches in September 2017. GSA faculty members will teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week international Winter School, is a highlight of the programme.

Straight off the podium having delivered an inspiring keynote presentation at Winter School 2017, Catherine tells us more about the themes she addresses, and why Winter School helps deliver innovative business education for those in the creative industries.

Catherine, welcome to Winter School. Your keynote met a very warm reception, what did you share with the students?

My colleague Sandrine Stervinou and I wanted to share our research interest for cooperatives in the Cultural and Creative Industries. We have been studying them in France and we believe that they could be an answer for young creative practitioners. Co-ops are usually resilient and sustainable businesses.

These co-op businesses give a chance to those who want to escape precariousness and isolation whilst developing management and business skills in a collective, democratic and creative environment.

A collaboration between a business school and an art school may surprise some, can you tell us why it makes good sense?

I strongly believe that hybridity is the future of higher education. The fast-changing world in which we live calls for a wide mix of skills and competencies. Students will acquire them through renewed curricula which break subject and discipline silos. For instance, business students need to develop creative skills to deal with ambiguity whereas design and art students acquire this competence quite early in their learning. Design students could benefit from the ways we teach our students to analyse business environments and management issues. A blended business/design programme like the MSc we designed together with The Glasgow School of Art will enable students to change thinking caps on a regular basis.

And why is collaboration at the Highlands and Islands Creative Campus important to you?

The Highlands and Islands and Moray gives us a great platform to initiate projects – research or otherwise – which are relevant to rural regions internationally, and explore the role of cultural and creative industries in supporting the development of these areas.

I already have students asking when they can come!

What does the Winter School format offer you that is unique?

The School will be a pivotal moment on the Masters programme calendar as students will move their projects from theory into real-life entrepreneurial practice. Wearing a design hat, they will be plunged in a different cultural environment which will prepare them to ask the right questions for their collaborative entrepreneurial activities and career.

Finally, if you could sum Winter School up in three words, what would they be?

Am I allowed more than three?…

…humanity, trust, conviviality, open-mindedness, relaxed, family feel, flow, creativity, space

Catherine Morel lecturing at Winter School

A packed Winter School audience for Catherine Morel. Image credit: Jane Candlish

What next?

Further info on the Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy (Programme subject to validation)

Find out more about Audencia Business School

Check out Catherine’s radio programme – Cash and Culture – which is supported by Audencia Foundation through the Audencia Research Lab.

 

 


Meet the people at Winter School 2017

Winter School is a highlight of the GSA’s annual calendar. This year, it has brought together around 100 leading design academics and students from all over the world to research and study at the GSA’s new Highlands and Islands Creative Campus.

Over two activity-filled weeks, students took part in lectures, workshops and joint research projects with local businesses and communities.

This year’s theme is Innovation from Tradition, which explores how past traditions can inspire future ways of working, and the role that design can play.

The GSA team at the Highlands and Islands Creative Campus have thoroughly enjoyed hosting such an exciting group at Winter School… And the good news is that the group have enjoyed it too! Find out what delegates at this year’s Winter School have to say about the experience:

Student Barbara Chalmers, who is on the MDES Design Innovation and Service Design programme.

View of Winter School: Barbara Chalmers from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

Student Puja Parekh, from MDES Design Innovation and Service Design, tells us about working with local companies.

Winter School 2017: “An eye-opening experience” from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

Professor Eva Brandt from the Royal Danish School of Fine Arts, School of Design (KADK), who has joined Winter School for the second year running. You can also read her blog piece here.

An international view of Winter School 2017: Professor Eva Brandt from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

From Köln International School of Design, Professor Philip Heidkamp has also attended for the second year.

An international view of Winter School 2017: Professor Philip Heidkamp from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

And last, but by no means least, Dr Gordon Hush who has led Winter School for GSA:

What to expect from InDI Winter School from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

For contact details and more information on InDI’S Design Innovation teaching programmes check out our website.