Life at the Creative Campus: the teaching studio


An insight into learning and teaching on our MDES programmes

It was always part of the plan for the Creative Campus in the Highlands and Islands to bring postgraduate students to the region for Design Innovation programmes.

There are currently three Master of Design Innovation programmes based in the north: Transformation Design, Collaborative Creativity, and Interaction Design. Information on the courses and how to apply is available via the links.

A small group of students are pioneering the MDES Design Innovation at the Creative Campus during this first year: an exciting time for all involved.

But the location offers unique opportunities for the group.

MDES teaching studio

One of our MDES students Poopak with tutor George Jaramillo in the Forres studio. Image credit: Paul Campbell

Studio lead for this session is Leigh-Anne Hepburn, a Research Fellow who works with the Experience Labs. Here she tells the InDI blog about some of the students’ recent activities.

“Our Forres-based students attended Winter School 2017 in January, working alongside their Glasgow counterparts for the first time. This was a great chance for them to meet others going through the same experience.

“After this busy two-week event, they went straight into their Stage 2 group project and were tasked with writing a brief. This is a critical design skill and offered a unique opportunity for them to shape the direction of their study.

“Under the theme, Innovation from Tradition, the group considered the individual concepts developed during Winter School – of transient communities and the role of third sector volunteering – and worked to develop a shared direction.

Student presenting to group

MDES student Yara presenting her team’s project at Winter School 2017. Image credit: Paul Campbell

“This is essentially a live project and the students are encouraged to go out and actively engage with local stakeholders. Luckily the people of Moray are very receptive to the musings of MDES students!

“As an international group, they were particularly interested in exploring the refugee experience of moving to Forres and the potential role volunteering could play in supporting community integration. After identifying key stakeholders, the students build a strong connection with partner organisations during their field research.

“When you are working with participants who are enthusiastic about design – and who can see the real potential for change it offers – you want to deliver the best possible outcome and create some value in return. Our students had the chance to do this when they ran their first co-design workshop, ‘Designing your volunteer experience’ last month. Created in partnership with tsiMORAY for the organisations’s conference for the third sector, Join the Dots, the workshop was attended by more than 20 people. Delivering a participatory workshop is an exciting and immersive experience and our students were delighted that it went so well.

Scenario tool

One of the scenario tools created by the MDES students for the workshop. Image credit: Leigh-Anne Hepburn

“Every rich story and anecdote gathered during field research offers new insight and it’s tempting to keep listening instead of moving towards designing solutions. This is especially true of the fast-paced 12 week project that the students have embarked on. However, after this intense period of research, our students have begun to identify the key insights and are designing some exciting final concepts.

“In the middle of all this, we travelled to Glasgow to join the wider MDES student and staff cohort for interim reviews. These presentations give students an opportunity to share the journey of their project and emerging design concepts, receiving some essential critical feedback and peer review in return.

“And in addition to the studio project, the students have also begun working on their specialisms, with expert input from teaching staff across GSA. It’s a real team effort.”

Recruitment is ongoing for our MDES programmes starting in September 2017 in Forres and Glasgow – and there are funded places available. Click here to find out more on the GSA’s website.

Also, the GSA and Digital Health & Care Institute are offering a limited number of funded places on the Master of Research programme to students exploring health-related topics. Find out more on the GSA’s website.

MDES students conference workshop

MDES students who led the workshop at the tsiMoray conference. Image credit: Leigh-Anne Hepburn

*Featured image by Paul Campbell


Seasonal Schools: an innovative teaching method


Research and Teaching on location at the GSA Highlands and Islands

InDI is proud of its teaching and research activities that support postgraduate students, researchers and academics. They offer an excellent chance to meet others in your field and learn about their experiences.

With the deadline for applications for Summer School 2017 in Lancaster extended until April 7, we’re reflecting on our Seasonal Schools and what they offer the people who take part.

InDI offers two main seasonal schools throughout the year: Winter School and Summer School.

Summer School

Organised by the Leapfrog team, the Summer School programme aims to help early career researchers to develop their skills. The three-day event includes a programme of lectures and discussions as well as sharing work and ideas.

Last year’s event was the first and took place in Forres, exploring action research with delegates from across the UK and overseas.

Leapfrog Summer School on the beach.

Leapfrog Summer School on Findhorn beach.

Applications for 2017 are open until Friday April 7. The event, from July 11-13, will take place at Lancaster University, where our Leapfrog partners, ImaginationLancaster, are based. The programme, titled Exploring Community Engagement for Research: Power, Impact and Collaborationwill share methods and insights around effective engagement and evidence the impact of these approaches. Professor Rachel Cooper OBE, Distinguished Professor of Design Management and Policy at Lancaster University, will give a keynote.

Delegates will take part in a series of presentations, discussions and workshops to enrich their understanding and applications of community engagement in a wide range of research contexts.

This video of the 2016 event gives a flavour of the Leapfrog Summer School:

Leapfrog Summer School 2016: Action Research, Engagement, & Co-​design from leapfrogtools on Vimeo.

You can find more information about the 2017 event and download an application pack on the Leapfrog website.

Winter School

As you can tell from our recent blogs, Winter School is an action-packed and high profile event.

The two-week residency at GSA Highlands and Islands involves students from our own MDES Design Innovation programmes as well as students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation (KADK) in Copenhagen. The international element is boosted by faculty from all over the world, who provide enlightening talks for the students.

Winter School 2018 will also involve students from Audencia Business School in France. Audencia and InDI have collaborated to develop an exciting MSc programme in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy. Led by Audencia, the programme launches in September 2017. GSA faculty members will teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week international Winter School at the GSA Highlands and Islands Creative Campus, is a highlight of the programme.

Jenny Houldsworth speaks to Winter School students

Jenny Houldsworth from Johnstons of Elgin speaks to Winter School students

The students explore a theme relevant to the local context and work with businesses and community organisations to gain insight into the topic. Working in groups, they explore a design research question. For GSA students, this is the first step in their Stage 2 project.

You can see what we got up to at Winter School 2017 in this video:

Winter School 2017 from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

For more information about Winter School, please contact Dr Gordon Hush, [email protected]


Re-Mantle and Make: Fashioning a way to a circular economy


The story of Re-Mantle

InDI’s Re-Mantle and Make project wrapped up last week with an event at MakLab in Glasgow.

The InDI team was delighted with the way that designers took on the challenge of using local surplus textiles to design a prototype circular collar that could be worn with different garments.

The project was a six-month feasibility study researching the potential for developing a circular economy within the textile manufacturing sector. In a circular economy, resources are used and re-used for as long as possible.

Designers and researchers gathered to celebrate the success of this short project and view the results of two ‘Re-Make-A-Thons’.

Designer reusing red textile fabric with Dr Lynn-Sayers McHattie

The Re-Mantle and Make project: reusing textile fabrics to explore ways to develop a circular economy in the textile manufacturing industry

Find out how the team got on in the film of Re-Mantle and Make:

Re-Mantle and Make: Design for the Circular Economy from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.

More on Remantle and Make

The GSA secured funding for the study from the Royal College of Art, London, which is leading a larger project: Future Makespaces in Redistributed Manufacturing, a two-year research initiative funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. This wider piece of work explores the role of maker spaces in redistributed manufacturing.

Designer using a sewing machine to reuse surplus textiles

Making new from surplus while designing ways to develop a circular economy

InDI’s work was in partnership with Kalopsia Collective – a micro-manufacturing unit based in Edinburgh, and MakLab Maker Space in Glasgow.

And you can read about the Re-Make-A-Thons, in Glasgow and Forres, on the Re-Mantle website.


Watch Winter School 2017: the official film


Relive the spirit of Winter School

Our new film gives you a flavour of our recent Winter School, which brought together around 100 leading international design experts, researchers and students to the GSA’s Highlands and Islands Creative Campus in Moray. 

It shows all the sights and sounds – and the people – who took part in the hugely successful event. There’s some spectacular shots of our new campus and even a bit of ceilidh dancing!

Led by InDI, Winter School is one of the highlights of the GSA’s academic calendar. The two-week programme, which runs every January, includes lectures, workshops, research and joint projects with local businesses and communities. Students and academics explore themes rooted in the local context but with global resonances.

The theme this year was Innovation from Tradition, which explores how past tradition can inspire future ways of working and, in particular, the role that design can play.

Our guest speakers travelled from across the world to take part, including Portugal, Italy, the US, India and Singapore.

Postgraduate students from the GSA’s Masters students on Design Innovation and Communication Design programmes were joined by students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation). 

Winter School 2017 from The Glasgow School of Art on Vimeo.


Making a difference to business


Continuing Professional Development programmes for organisations

InDI’s Continuing Professional Development (CPD) programmes help organisations create cultures of innovation and develop creative capability. Here, Design Director Don McIntyre tells us how InDI’s design-led CPD programmes make a difference to businesses.

Don McIntyre portrait

Don McIntyre. Image credit: Louise Mather

Design-led CPD for businesses

Many organisations face similar systemic challenges as they look to the future. They may need to address complex issues that no company or government can tackle alone; adapt in the face of digital disruption, or create conditions for a new business to thrive.

Historically, innovation approaches have been found in disciplines such as management and engineering. In recent times, design has become a recognised strategic capability for individuals, organisations and even countries looking to deal positively with uncertainty, ambiguity, paradox and complexity.

Our programmes

Our CPD programmes in Design Innovation help businesses create lasting cultures of innovation. By tailoring our approach to each organisation, we create practical learning plans that are suited to organisational context and staff needs. We collaborate with partners to deliver courses that last anything from a day to a year, including:

– An introduction to design innovation

– Project-specific training and coaching

– Leadership development programmes

Organisations and individuals learn, think and act differently as a result of our programmes, delivering tangible results for their businesses.

‘We have seen up to six-figure savings in some of our products through cutting back on waste issues… [We are] quicker at making a decision and acting than before’

John Lupton, CEO, Scott & Fyfe

John Swinney MSP with Scott and Fyfe chairman Nick Kuenssberg and CEO John Lupton opening innovation space

John Swinney MSP with Scott and Fyfe chairman Nick Kuenssberg and CEO John Lupton at the opening of the company’s innovation space.

Learn more about our work with Scott and Fyfe during the Creating Cultures of Innovation project.

If you’d like to find out more about our CPD programmes please contact:

Iain Aitchison, Programme Director, InDI

[email protected]

or

Don McIntyre, Design Director, InDI

[email protected]

 

 


A special visitor to GSA Highlands and Islands


Deputy First Minister John Swinney tours Altyre studios

The GSA Highlands and Islands Creative Campus had a special visitor yesterday as the Deputy First Minister John Swinney toured the facilities outside Forres.

He was accompanied by Moray MSP Richard Lochhead and the pair were shown round the complex by Professor Irene McAra-McWilliam OBE, Deputy Director (Innovation) of the GSA and Director of the Highlands and Islands Creative Campus, and Dr Gordon Hush, Acting Director of InDI.

Among the projects presented to Mr Swinney was the Experience Labs, which has recently worked with local secondary pupils on a campaign to promote breastfeeding. Mr Swinney also heard about the new prosthetic greaves project, which aims to explore the emotional value of different aesthetics for prostheses. He also met MDES and MRES students based at the campus and saw work from the recent Winter School.

You can read more in the press release at www.gsapress.blogspot.co.uk

Tara French and John Swinney with prosthetic greaves

Deputy First Minister John Swinney and Dr Tara French examine items from the Prosthetic Greaves project by Naturally Useful. Image credit: Hannah Laycock


Five minutes with a Winter School expert: Catherine Morel

Catherine Morel is Professor of Marketing in the Culture and Communication Department at Audencia Business School in France. Catherine has collaborated with InDI over the last two years to develop an exciting MSc programme in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy. Led by Audencia in France, the programme and has been co-designed with InDI.

The programme launches in September 2017. GSA faculty members will teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week international Winter School, is a highlight of the programme.

Straight off the podium having delivered an inspiring keynote presentation at Winter School 2017, Catherine tells us more about the themes she addresses, and why Winter School helps deliver innovative business education for those in the creative industries.

Catherine, welcome to Winter School. Your keynote met a very warm reception, what did you share with the students?

My colleague Sandrine Stervinou and I wanted to share our research interest for cooperatives in the Cultural and Creative Industries. We have been studying them in France and we believe that they could be an answer for young creative practitioners. Co-ops are usually resilient and sustainable businesses.

These co-op businesses give a chance to those who want to escape precariousness and isolation whilst developing management and business skills in a collective, democratic and creative environment.

A collaboration between a business school and an art school may surprise some, can you tell us why it makes good sense?

I strongly believe that hybridity is the future of higher education. The fast-changing world in which we live calls for a wide mix of skills and competencies. Students will acquire them through renewed curricula which break subject and discipline silos. For instance, business students need to develop creative skills to deal with ambiguity whereas design and art students acquire this competence quite early in their learning. Design students could benefit from the ways we teach our students to analyse business environments and management issues. A blended business/design programme like the MSc we designed together with The Glasgow School of Art will enable students to change thinking caps on a regular basis.

And why is collaboration at the Highlands and Islands Creative Campus important to you?

The Highlands and Islands and Moray gives us a great platform to initiate projects – research or otherwise – which are relevant to rural regions internationally, and explore the role of cultural and creative industries in supporting the development of these areas.

I already have students asking when they can come!

What does the Winter School format offer you that is unique?

The School will be a pivotal moment on the Masters programme calendar as students will move their projects from theory into real-life entrepreneurial practice. Wearing a design hat, they will be plunged in a different cultural environment which will prepare them to ask the right questions for their collaborative entrepreneurial activities and career.

Finally, if you could sum Winter School up in three words, what would they be?

Am I allowed more than three?…

…humanity, trust, conviviality, open-mindedness, relaxed, family feel, flow, creativity, space

Catherine Morel lecturing at Winter School

A packed Winter School audience for Catherine Morel. Image credit: Jane Candlish

What next?

Further info on the Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy (Programme subject to validation)

Find out more about Audencia Business School

Check out Catherine’s radio programme – Cash and Culture – which is supported by Audencia Foundation through the Audencia Research Lab.